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Thread: work at height regs

  1. #11
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    Looks like a clear case of John Houlihan advertising his product on here to me
    Managing Director of Scaffgap
    Hardest Game In The World

  2. #12
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    And so say all of us,superscaff.
    Great post mate.
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  3. #13
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    ive just checked his website out , to be honest it looks a decent bit of kit ,
    reduces gaps
    enviromentally friendly made out of recycled pvc-u
    also can be recycled again if nescessary
    30 to 40 year expected life span

    all in all seems a good decent idea

    but if he wants to sponsor the forum he should speak to sf admin

    good product john i like it what sort of price does it retail at
    "We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, therefore, is not an act but a habit." Aristotle

  4. #14
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    John you are not allowed to free advertise, without SF admin permission.

    I realise your Kit is good and you recieved a award at the IOSH presentations, Well done.I must add. However, mate, why not become a 'Sponser' to the Forum, and promotion will be spread by word of mouth by over 3,000 members.

    Regards
    Patrick Carr Tech IOSH
    Treat life like a dog: If you can't eat it, play with it, or hump it, p1$$ on it and walk away!

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  6. #15
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    I totally agree paddy and why doesnt he member the SCCR aswell while he is at it..

  7. #16
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    Superscaff, took the words from my mouth. The same housekeeping rules on a scaffold platform should be enforced as on a floor.

    ---------- Post added at 04:28 PM ---------- Previous post was at 03:39 PM ----------

    John Houlihan, You mentioned in your post a piece of re bar falling through the 50mm gap resulting in an accident. Agree the scaffgap would have prevented it. But the real issue here that concerns scaffolders, is why such materials are left lying on the scaffold in the first place. We have to follow the good housekeeping rules and clear up our surplus materials rightly so. So why is it not enforced on other trades. I have seen many incidences of materials such as re bar, or threaded bar and bundles of welding rods stuffed down scaffold tubes because of laziness of the workers involved to remove them from the scaffold, all accidents waiting to happen. If you complain your told end cap all tubes, thats the favourite solution, more work, more expense on the scaffolder/ scaffold company. instead of the site management enforcing the housekeeping rules. The worse example of this i seen was a 6ft long piece of re bar slid down a 21ft topper and on the strip a scaff nearly lost his balance taking it out unaware. These are issues the powers that be should be looking at and educating the scaffold users that just as the scaffolder, they too have responsibilities for the prevention of accidents. keeping a debris free scaffold would be a good start.

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    Joe90 (26th September 2010)

  9. #17
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    Hi superscaff,

    Yes the safety systems are a costly extra to all work at height activity and all contracts highly competitive. Our main customers are Principle Contractors who install ScaffGap as an after thought, once they realise the potential risk the 50mm gap poses. It also provides the only cost effective solution to the problem, 1000% quicker and cheaper than other methods used.
    H&S do consider housekeeping as a real problem on sites but are not in a position to control the daily work activity by contractors and site management. Site Management are there to manage works and part of that duty is to ensure high standards of housekeeping at all times. If site management done their job properly, poor housekeeping would not exist.
    Scaffolding works has undergone a revolutionary change of days gone by but there is still those who live in the past. Yes, commercially safe working practices has pressurised the industry somewhat but leaving the old style of erecting scaffold would have far greater commercial consequences if things went wrong. The bigger picture makes all the innovative advancements cost effective and once embraced will even win you contracts.
    Advanced guardrail systems, self closing ladder gates, ladder hatch covers, double guardrails, harnesses, training, etc etc etc do not come cheap. I do believe that tube and fitting scaffold will still be around for years to come but I also believe a system scaffold should be developed that has a push-up guardrail to alleviate these expensive measures currently on the market. The next edition of SG4 will be an interesting read. I did hear rumours that harnesses will be a thing of the past.
    ScaffGap is considered by many as a consumable and the cost can be passed on to the Client, as is Monarflex and debris netting. I hope it has given you another option to providing a real solution to the problem superscaff75. I wish you all the best.

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    John

    Thanks for the interesting post mate. However, i dont think the wearing of a Harness will be a thing of the past. firstly, irrespective of Advanced Guardrails or not. If every lift is not fully boarded, you will need to clip on when raising or lowering the boards. Secondly, for Cantilever,truss out,Hangars and Beam work, you will need Harness's.

    Why would you need a 'System scaff' with a adapaptation for 'Advanced Guardrails' you already have the major components there. All you need to do is add a couple of hop up brkts, to the inside of the working platform, at handrail height, once your ledger is installed, add a couple of decks and instal your upper handrail.

    Regards
    Paddy
    Treat life like a dog: If you can't eat it, play with it, or hump it, p1$$ on it and walk away!

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    not knocking the scaffgap but weve used it on the grid its good stuff providing the boards are nice and new.if not its a pain i found after a while it started to twist and didnt lay flat and ended up causing more of a trip hazard unless you put nails down the edge of it wouldnt last five minutes on a building site.

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    The 9 Principles of Protection - referred to in Regulation 4 of the Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations 1999 (Schedule 1) are as follows – note No. 5
    1 Avoiding risks
    2 Evaluating risks which cannot be avoided
    3 Combating risks at source
    4 Adapting the work to suit the individual, especially as regards the design of workplaces, the choice of work equipment and the choice of working and production methods, with a in particular, to alleviating monotonous work and work at a predetermined work rate and to reduce their effect on health
    5 Adapting to technical progress
    6 Replacing the dangerous by the non-dangerous
    7 Developing a coherent overall prevention policy which covers technology, organising of work, working conditions, social relationships and the influence of factors relating to the working environment
    8 Giving collective protective measures priority over individual protective measures
    9 Giving appropriate instructions to employees

    The Principles are very often:
    • Not known;
    • Not Understood;
    • Disregarded

    There is continuous technical advancement. Not just in the scaffolding industry but in all construction activities – some will work, some won’t. But employing organisations must demonstrate their attempts keep abreast of and try-out new or modified technical advancement.

    Like other posters, I too have experienced (and seen the consequences of) materials, including re-bar falling through gaps and voids in decked-out lifts. Equally the basics of housekeeping and materials management on working lifts should and must be rigorously monitored and enforced by principle contractors

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