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Havespannerwilltravel
2nd December 2012, 05:43 PM
Over her they adhere strictly to TG20:08 it is their bible. They apply it to system scaffolds as well despite the front cover clearly stating tube and fittings.
I have briefly scanned TG20:08 in between my duties as moderator and doing sweet fa.
I cant see any reference to what way up a double should be on a puncheon. I can clearly remember SGB having short (1 metre) cuplok puncheons that were generally used on staircases. These I think had the double with the gate in the normal way not upside down. Any one have any views?

Tufty
2nd December 2012, 05:51 PM
Tested both ways so you are right, but good practice is gate down on a punchoen especially if it was a long un you were doing up yourself!!!!!!!. The cuplok ones are as you say so you can see it dont really matter!!!!!

aom
2nd December 2012, 05:55 PM
Why don't you just line anyone up against a wall and shoot anyone who wants to apply tg20 to system, save a bit of time?

Havespannerwilltravel
2nd December 2012, 06:00 PM
But why is it good practice? Obviously I agree from knowing the days when you used to punch up 21s solo but those days have long gone. Also as a warning to other scaffs so fair enough.
The theory here is that if the bolt is knocked out then the puncheon will hang on the gate. If the double is up the right way it would take some force from below to knock the bolt oot.

---------- Post added at 07:00 PM ---------- Previous post was at 06:58 PM ----------


Why don't you just line anyone up against a wall and shoot anyone who wants to apply tg20 to system, save a bit of time?

I whole heartedly agree aom unfortunately Qatar Airlines wouldnt let me bring my piece on the flight from Manila.

AxSD
2nd December 2012, 06:01 PM
Agreed with tufty regarding the puncheon.

In my view I would say its dangerous applying TG20 to system...mainly the tie patterns. Adopt a 4m x 4m (alternate frames x alternate lifts) tie pattern and the system will almost certainly not be adequately tied because most systems need a tie pattern that ties every frame.

Havespannerwilltravel
2nd December 2012, 06:04 PM
I agree but try and tell these fu**kers lol

aom
2nd December 2012, 06:08 PM
Do they not have product training?

---------- Post added at 07:08 PM ---------- Previous post was at 07:07 PM ----------


Agreed with tufty regarding the puncheon.

In my view I would say its dangerous applying TG20 to system...mainly the tie patterns. Adopt a 4m x 4m (alternate frames x alternate lifts) tie pattern and the system will almost certainly not be adequately tied because most systems need a tie pattern that ties every frame.

Genlock pretty much looked like they copied and pasted the tg20 tie pattern for their manual.

jonnybegood
2nd December 2012, 07:52 PM
Over her they adhere strictly to TG20:08 it is their bible. They apply it to system scaffolds as well despite the front cover clearly stating tube and fittings.
I have briefly scanned TG20:08 in between my duties as moderator and doing sweet fa.
I cant see any reference to what way up a double should be on a puncheon. I can clearly remember SGB having short (1 metre) cuplok puncheons that were generally used on staircases. These I think had the double with the gate in the normal way not upside down. Any one have any views?

You are correct about the cup lock standards. The gate is up the normal way. But like you say they are only 1m and easy to handle and used for hand rails on a stair thread with 1.8 bracings used as the hand rails.
They can also be used to reduce a bigger bay to a smaller bay, to do this you need the double spindle without the sole plate of course.

They call these standard in Holland Learning standards. Don’t know what they are called in the UK

aom
2nd December 2012, 07:58 PM
Might be a Genlock thing but the only puncheons I have seen are the ones with the double at the very bottom of the tube.

jonnybegood
2nd December 2012, 08:02 PM
But why is it good practice? Obviously I agree from knowing the days when you used to punch up 21s solo but those days have long gone. Also as a warning to other scaffs so fair enough.
The theory here is that if the bolt is knocked out then the puncheon will hang on the gate. If the double is up the right way it would take some force from below to knock the bolt oot.

---------- Post added at 07:00 PM ---------- Previous post was at 06:58 PM ----------



I whole heartedly agree aom unfortunately Qatar Airlines wouldnt let me bring my piece on the flight from Manila.



I have to disagree with you if the bolt came loose it would hang on the gate, I was always taught, it was to show the next scaff stripping the job for example ,exactly what the fitting was doing on the tube. And to take the weight of a long one while putting it in, especially on your own. Why guys don’t make up a simple template to come off a standard at waist height to take the weight of the tube. Then do up your punchin at the lower level. Makes life a lot easier and only takes another minute...

Bri
2nd December 2012, 09:45 PM
You can always put a the double on the ledger and install a check to the puncheon, slide in your tube and it stops when it hits the check fitting and takes the weight.

I was always told double upside down on a puncheon to take the weight and to let others know the tube did not go to ground.

Havespannerwilltravel
3rd December 2012, 12:39 AM
You are correct about the cup lock standards. The gate is up the normal way. But like you say they are only 1m and easy to handle and used for hand rails on a stair thread with 1.8 bracings used as the hand rails.
They can also be used to reduce a bigger bay to a smaller bay, to do this you need the double spindle without the sole plate of course.

They call these standard in Holland Learning standards. Don’t know what they are called in the UK

Used to think they were called learning stds or even leaning stds until a wise old cloggy told me it was leuning.

---------- Post added at 01:39 AM ---------- Previous post was at 01:36 AM ----------


I have to disagree with you if the bolt came loose it would hang on the gate, I was always taught, it was to show the next scaff stripping the job for example ,exactly what the fitting was doing on the tube. And to take the weight of a long one while putting it in, especially on your own. Why guys don’t make up a simple template to come off a standard at waist height to take the weight of the tube. Then do up your punchin at the lower level. Makes life a lot easier and only takes another minute...

That was I was always led to believe but not according to the experts out here.